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Highlights of the OCTOBER 2013 Issue

 

SUSTAINABILITY

 

• KU Takes Steps to Lower Waste at Athletic Events

 

When Manuel Abarca, recycling operations coordinator with the Center for Sustainability at the University of Kansas (KU) in Lawrence first arrived on campus in January, KU Recycling was looking to build a recycling culture on campus.

“I didn't feel like there was one that was established,” he said. “So we tried to think of a way that would get that going, because it is not about hanging signs out and having it happen. There had to be something that sparked the movement.”

That was when the center decided to approach the Athletics Department for some help. “Obviously, when you think of KU, you think of KU Basketball,” he said. “From KU Basketball is where everything started. Last season, I walked around two of the last home games for basketball. From that, I realized that we were missing a lot of material.” ...

The program's first steps seem to be successful. “A total 22 percent of our waste was diverted,” said Abarca. “We recycled about 1.5 tons of material and we were at just .75 ton for compost. One hundred percent of that material would have gone to the landfill.” ...

Read more KU TAKES STEPS TO LOWER WASTE AT ATHLETIC EVENTS ...

• Aquaponics a Success at Montana

 

Dining Services at the University of Montana in Missoula recently installed a closed-loop aquaponics food production system in its residential dining hall, the Food Zoo.

Aquaponics is an integrated sustainable food production system that combines traditional aquaculture (raising seafood) with hydroponics (growing plants in water), to produce food, fertilizer and manage waste all in one self-contained system. Fish are raised in tanks where they produce waste in the form of ammonia. This ammonia is perfect for feeding plants, but isn't yet in a form that is useful for plants. The water in the tank is inoculated with microbes that convert the fish ammonia into nitrogen that is useful for plants. The water is then pumped into the growing area where it makes its way through four levels of plants and volcanic rocks that take up the nutrients and effectively filter the water. The clean water is then returned to the fish tank and the cycle continues.

The system also has a financial benefit for Dining Services. With a market rate of $36 per pound from local growers, the 200 pounds produced equals $7,200 worth of product. “While these systems are great for producing food, they are also models of innovation in the food industry and demonstrate a commitment to sustainability that is visible to the community,”” said Christina Voyles, director of Marketing with University Dining Services. “Our system has provided a forum to bring students and community together to discuss sustainable food systems, and provides an excellent model for how students can engage the campus to become leaders in sustainable food systems.” ...

Read more AQUAPONICS A SUCCESS AT MONTANA ...

• MSU: It Doesn't Get More Local Than This

 

Dining Services at Morehead State University in Kentucky, operated by Aramark, has begun purchasing a number of its ingredients from a very local source — the university itself.

The university, through its Department of Agricultural Sciences, runs a farm that produces produce, cattle and even seafood. “In the past, they taught local farmers and Agricultural Science majors how to farm tobacco, using a water method,” said Eric Evans, general manager of Dining Services. “They used ponds. Since the university is going away from tobacco, they got into raising freshwater shrimp and freshwater tilapia in these old tobacco ponds. When they started doing that, they found that they didn’t quite have the market after they harvested them. Basically, they were teaching folks how to do it, but the fish and the shrimp weren’t really selling at the local farmer’s markets.”

When they didn’t find a market for the items, they asked Aramark, as their dining service partner, to purchase them. “For the last two years, as they harvest the shrimp and tilapia, we have been purchasing them and using them in our dining services,” he said. “We do a lot of high-end catering with the shrimp, because it is not a vast quantity. With the tilapia, we serve it in our residential halls, in our retail areas, when they come in.” ...

Read more MSU: IT DOESN'T GET MORE LOCAL THAN THIS...

 

• GREEN DIRECTORY

 

The demand for sustainable products and services in college and university food service remains very high. Students, faculty and staff have an increased interest in knowing how their schools are working to meet this demand.

Letting them know what programs you are undertaking on campus is a start, but being able to provide them with the green initiatives your suppliers have implemented will help you to broaden your students' understanding of the total efforts you are taking on campus. ...

Read more GREEN DIRECTORY...

 

 

SEAFOOD: Murray State Serves Up Fresh Seafood

 

Waffles with syrupThe popularity of seafood has been growing on the campus of Murray State University in Kentucky for the last few years.

“Murray State is located in Western Kentucky, so the accessibility of seagoing fish has not been huge around here,” said Tim Bruce, department chef manager. “As we introduce more fish, it seems like over the last couple of years, it is definitely starting to grow. Students, in general, are starting to eat healthier and definitely have more food knowledge than in past years. All that adds up to more interesting items.” ...

“We make our order on Monday morning or Sunday night, and get our fish on Wednesday morning,” he said. “They have an online order system where you can see all of the different docks they work with and what's available off of those docks. We certainly have some price structures we work in, so we normally stay within those and know what is available for that week.”

He continued, “The fact that it was small-boat, day fishermen, even though they are not local to us, they are all family-run businesses, so it was worthwhile via the double-bubble of the freshness of this fish — letting the kids try these ocean fishes that are really fresh and sustainable. The fact that we are supporting local, small businessmen and women and their families just hit on a lot of good notes for us. Is it a little more expensive than buying from our prime vendor? Yes, but I think it is more than worth it.” ...

Read more MURRAY STATE SERVES UP FRESH SEAFOOD...


 

DESIGN
• Renovated Durrell Dining Center Opens at Colorado State

 

Hampton Dining CommonWith a new 600-bed resident hall opening adjacent to the Durrell Dining Center at Colorado State University (CSU) in Fort Collins, the time was right for a renovation.

The building was originally built in 1968. “Before we renovated it, the facility was not capable of serving an additional 600 people,” said Deon Lategan, director of Residential Dining. “We renovated the upstairs, which was an old '60s stainless-steel-counter-type place. We opened the kitchen, and then we added the venues out front. Those are heavily equipped, so a lot of the production happens out-front marketplace-style in front of the customer.”

The university chose to complete the $10 million renovation a full year before the new residence hall is scheduled to open. “It is a huge project, so we closed last year while we were doing this renovation,” he said. “We really opened a year in advance prior to the students getting here. The method in our madness was that we wanted to make sure that we could handle it. To open a new facility is a complex process, and then to add an additional 600 students [at the same time] was something that we really weren't prepared to do.”

A major part of the renovation was streamlining speed of service, while also allowing the students the ability to customize their meals. “We moved a lot of the production out to the customer, so the throughput is a lot faster than the traditional stand in lane and wait for whatever is being served that day,” said Lategan. ...

Read more RENOVATED DURRELL DINING CENTER OPENS AT COLORADO STATE ...

• Penn State Altoona Opens Renovated Port Sky Café

 

Hampton Dining CommonSince it first opened in 2001, Port Sky Café at Penn State Altoona has offered classic American fare and a place to meet and study for nearly 4,000 enrolled students, as well as faculty and staff. With its stainless steel fixtures and images of drive-ins and waitresses on roller skates lining the walls, the dining commons offered a look back to the 1950s. Eventually though, the thriving campus began to outgrow the space and the diner theme became dated, which led Housing and Food Services to prepare for a renovation.

“We outgrew ourselves because we became a four-year college,” said Alison Bonsell, director of Housing and Food Services. “For that reason, it started to get pretty crowded. Students complained that the lines were too long to the registers. The food was cold by the time they got through. They couldn't find seats and friends could not sit together. We outgrew it, but we also wanted to modernize the look.”

“We wanted to stay current,” added Chris Hurley, senior director, Housing and Food Services, Commonwealth Campus and Culinary Support Services. “We wanted to offer new products, new cooking methods, as well as keep with what students are experiencing outside of school.”

Read more PENN STATE ALTOONA OPENS RENOVATED PORT SKY CAFÉ ...


 



ALSO IN THIS ISSUE:

  • SHOW PREVIEW — NACAS Heads to Anaheim
  • GRAB 'N GO — Healthy Choices on the Go
  • BREAD BASKET
    • Bates Bakes Up Novel Sustainability Solution
    • From-Scratch Breads at Case Western Reserve
  • AROUND THE CAMPUS —
    • Pepperdine Welcomes New Executive Chef —
      Caroline Bertsch
    • UMass Sets Another Guinness World Record
    • UConn's UCann Cook Camps Educate and Delight Local Children
    • Zeta Tau Alpha (ZTA) Helps Fight Breast Cancer
    • Loyola Marymount University Partners with LA MTA
    • Several Colleges Finalists for Awards
  • EYE ON INDUSTRY
    • King and Prince Holding Recipe Contest
    • Ruiz Among Top Hispanic Businesses
    • CBORD Names New Division General Manager — Tony Lista
    • Aramark Introduces 'Healthy For Life'
  • MIND YOUR BUSINESS —
    How Do You Encourage Commuter Students To Eat On Campus?
  • CORPORATE CHEF PROFILE —
    Furmano Foods — Paul Burkholder
  • THE BACK PAGE — Change is Coming. Are You Ready?
    Find Out With NACAS in Anaheim! —
    Frank Mumford and Don Penrod, CASP